NPR Watch (7/6/17) – NPR’s Disconnect from Reality


7/6/17

On National Public Radio this morning, on their fake news program, “Morning Edition,” they did a feature on, get this: the 60th anniversary of the first meeting between John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

Yep. Not kidding.

Someone (1) knew when that was, and (2) knew that this is the 60th anniversary of it, and (3) … cared.

When, do you recall, was the last time you had the time to sit down and research the 60th anniversary of the first meeting between two actually important people?!?

Oh, Lennon and McCartney weren’t entirely trivial… millions of people did lots of stuff, and moved lots of money around, in response to things they did. But their very first meeting was trivial. I wonder when they did their first sleepover.

Look, let’s face it: Lennon and McCartney weren’t Churchill, or Tolstoy, or Reagan, or Mozart, or Michelangelo, or Eisenhower, or MacArthur, or Patton, or on the other side: Hitler, or Stalin, or Mao, or any of ten million other people of far greater real importance in history than they were.

So, someone or someones spent hundreds of hours of their time to track down the 60th freakin’ anniversary of the monumentally trivial first meeting between John Lennon and Paul McCartney because… well, because they had the time.

NPR is a network peopled by the leisured rich, living in gated communities, separated from real life, lived by real people. NPR’s people are people with… time. Lots of it. Time to research the incredibly trivial, and then to present it to you and me as if it proves how deep and cultured, and gosh, just how cool they are.

At the end of the feature, the reporterette, one Neda Ulaby, said, “Maybe we should take the time to reflect on how those whose paths we cross shape our lives.” Presumably she thought she was unburdening herself of great and deep wisdom here, something profound and insightful. Really, though, she was simply saying, “I have free time. Lots of free time, and as a result, you can tell that I’m really deep.”

When was the last time you had the opportunity to sit down and reflect on how those whose paths you’ve crossed have shaped your life?”

These NPR people are caricatures of real people. Disconnected, out-of-touch, remote, aloof, gated-community, élitist, snobby  liberals, with loads of money and time to spend on things like “reflecting on how those whose paths we cross shape our lives.”

The worst, most galling thing about all this? With our hard-earned tax money, you and I pay these bloviating bozos to be the rich, remote, out-of-touch clodpoles they are.

— xPraetorius

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “NPR Watch (7/6/17) – NPR’s Disconnect from Reality

  1. Many thanks, Philip Augustine! I took the liberty of adding the second “n” to the last word in your comment. I have to admit that I kind of liked it as it was, but figured it was not what you meant. 🙂

    As to the gist of your comment: you’re so right! I experienced the same thing. What’s funny is that at a certain point, I realized that they were all style and no substance. They went through a time when you could have taken every “news” piece they did and converted it, unchanged, into a Democrat Party generic campaign commercial.

    They’ve gone back to that now. And they definitely do not broadcast news in any way. However, their snobbery positively drips from their hyper-affected, completely fake “just plain folks” facade.

    My favorite thing is when someone on another network interviews one of their on-air personalities. At that point, they can’t help it: they spend the entire interview telling the interviewer how smart, how educated, sophisticated, and just how good and, gosh, how great they are.

    Best,

    — x

Please Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s