Islam in The 21st Century


Bottom Line: When the framers wrote the First Amendment, the idea was almost completely unknown that a fundamental tenet of one religion [Islam] would be that there should be no freedom of religion, for any other religion.

No “First Amendment” could even be written in the context of any mix of faiths that might include Islam. At some point, we’ll all have to confront that reality in a rational way. 


When the founders of the United States wrote the First Amendment of the Constitution, they were considering religions that were well known at the time, and that were, mainly, different flavors of Christianity.

You had the Puritans, the Deists, the Anglicans and other Protestants, the Catholics, and that was about it. Yes, people knew about the “Mohamedans,” adherents to Islam, but no one knew a whole heckuva lot about them, or about Islam.

So, when the First Amendment was written, the main worry was about one strain of Christianity impeding the freedom to worship of another strain of Christianity.

Well, what do you do when one of the religions whose adherents’ rights you’re avid to protect insist that you have no freedom of religion? An important part of Islam is the idea that if you’re not a muslim, then you have no right to practice your religion.

When the framers wrote the First Amendment, the idea was almost completely unknown that a fundamental tenet of one religion would be that there should be no freedom of religion, for any other religion.

No “First Amendment” could even be written in the context of any mix of faiths that might include Islam. At some point, we’ll all have to confront that reality in a rational way.

— xPraetorius

Notes:


(1) Text of the First Amendment of the Constitution:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

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